Historical Facts (downloadable)

 

Historical facts – NEAFS

  • "NEAFS was founded in 1975 by a group of dedicated forensic scientists dedicated to improving the professional status and technical capabilities of individuals engaged in all phases of forensic science." "To accomplish its goals, NEAFS conducts continuing education seminars featuring workshops and special training sessions. The Annual Meeting…resents a contagious atmosphere of scientific exchange and social congeniality."Mark Lewis, President 1980The first Editor of the newsletter in 1976 was R.E. Gaensslen
  • The first meeting of the Executive Board was on May 1, 1976 by President Angelo Fatta. Also in attendance were Vincent Crispino, R.E. Gaensslen, Thomas Kubic, Carl Moller and Alexander Stirton.
  • On this first meeting, it was stated that there were 211 members and this number included applicants. Six of those members were upgraded to Regular members.
  • The first annual meeting was being discussed. The annual meeting was to be a one day meeting on or about October 23, 1976. Tentative sites were John Jay College or C.W. Post College. The schedule was: 8am-12pm Coffee and Registration, business meeting and split sessions; Lunch; 1pm-5pm two general interest talks, split sessions, mixer and dinner. The split sessions included serology, microscopy, arson, toxicology and drug identification. The general interest talks would be short and would be concerning aspects of forensic science that would be unfamiliar or unusual to most members.
  • NEAFS was incorporated by the State of Connecticut on May 12, 1976. Vincent Crispino, Thomas Kubic and Henry Lee were the Incorporators.
  • The NEAFS newsletters were published by the Forensic Sciences Foundation which was located in Maryland.
  • A joint meeting was held on April 15-16 with MAAFS in New Jersey as well as the Annual Meeting of NEAFS on October 29th in 1977.
  • Dr. Peter De Forest chaired the Hairs and Fibers Session during the Second Annual Meeting. Alexander Stirton chaired the Serology Session and Dr. Jesse Bidanset chaired the Toxicology Session during the Second Annual Meeting.
  • The newsletters included information from other regional organizations as well as NEAFS.
  •  In 1977, the BOD acted as an ad hoc Education Committee and set up two courses intitled: "Forensic Microscopy" and "Introduction to the Forensic Applications of Infrared Spectroscopy".
  •  A luncheon was held during the 3rd Annual meeting of NEAFS and consisted of salad, a choice of roast beef or filet of sole, dessert and a beverage for $6.00. Cocktails were $1.50 and beer and wine were $1.00.
  • In 1978, the annual meeting was increased to a two day program instead of one day.
  • George Neighbor volunteered to chair the Paint analysis program for the 1978 Annual Meeting.
  • In 1978, NEAFS sponsored a training course entitled "Basic Bloodstain Analysis" and it was taught by Dr. Henry Lee, Dr. R.E. Gaensslen and Dr. Peter De Forest. This course was held at the University of New Haven.
  • George W. Neighbor was the Secretary of NEAFS in 1978.
  • Thomas A. Kubic was voted in as a Life Member of NEAFS while he was President in 1978.
  • In 1979, Chris Chany was approved to become a Provisional member from a student member and Peter Diaczuk was approved to be a Corresponding member.
  • George W. Neighbor was President-elect in 1980.
  • Travel reimbursement for mileage was 17 cents/mile in 1980.
  • NEAFS had 400 members in 1980.
  • In May 1980 in Louisville Kentucky, NEAFS participated in the first multi-regional association meeting.
  • George W. Neighbor had a BA degree in Chemistry from Rider College and a MS in Forensic Science from John Jay College. He worked as a Principal Forensic Chemist for the NJSP in the North Regional Laboratory in Little Falls, NJ where he supervises the trace evidence and bio-chemical units. Prior to working with the NJSP, He has twenty years of industrial research experience in materials analysis. He served as Secretary for two terms (1978-79) and was a member of the AAFS and the Forensic Science Academy. George became President of NEAFS in 1981 – the 7th year in NEAFS history. George stated at the end of his President’s message in the March 1981 newsletter "Now you can call me George, or you can call me G.W., or you can call me George W., or you can call me Hi Neighbor". In 1989, George presented "Trace Evidence Never Grows Old" during the Criminalistics Session.
  • In 1997, the Scholarship award was renamed the George W. Neighbor Jr. Memorial Scholarship
  • In 1980, the Annual Meeting budget was $2000.
  • 1980 Goals of NEAFS
  • Exchange ideas and information among professionals in the field
  • Promote recognition of forensic science as an important part of the justice system 
  • Sponsor and organize seminars, workshops, and special training sessions
  • Represent the membership on national issues affecting forensic science
  • Encourage research and development
  • Stimulate implementation of new methods and techniques
  • Establish professional standards
  • Provide advice on educational curricula, legislation and other matters affecting the profession
  • Arbitrate professional disputes
  • Foster friendship and collegiality among the forensic scientists of the Northeast
  • For the 10th Annual Meeting, the room rate was $55 (single or double).
  • The 12th annual meeting was the first meeting held in New England in Peabody, MA. A clam bake was scheduled.
  • The door prizes that were given out at the 11th Annual Meeting were a Commador 64 Computer, Cannon AE1 Camera, Reflecting Telescope and an AM-FM radio.
  • Our current method of visiting the exhibitor booths and obtaining confirmation of the visit goes back to at least the 9th Annual Meeting in 1983.
  • The door prizes given out at the 14th Annual Meeting which was donated by Perkin-Elmer were a Video Cassette Recorder, Compact Disk Player, Scientific Programmable Calculator, Cordless Telephone and a Sony Walkman.